Dissolution of Marriage Case(s)

As a licensed attorney licensed to practice law in the State of California, when it comes to family law cases, specifically dissolution of marriage cases, in my past experience and in my current experience, three (3) of the commonplace questions that I am asked are: (1) the length of time it will take for one to get divorced in the State of California; (2) the amount of hours of work it will take for one to get officially divorced in the State of California; and (3) the need for an attorney.

Length of time it will take to get divorced

            In the State of California, the earliest one can be divorced is six (6) months and one (1) from the date that the Petitioner (the party who opens the case by filing a Petition For Dissolution of Marriage) successfully personally served his or her spouse with the Petition For Dissolution of Marriage.

Amount of hours it will take for an attorney to get his or her client divorced

            Although the following is not an answer that potential family law divorce clients would like to hear, in my opinion, based upon my previous experience and my current experience, the following answer is the truth; it depends.

            Unfortunately, there is no time limit regarding hours as to how long a divorce case will take. There are a lot of variables and factors to analyze, assess, and evaluate. Unfortunately, a divorce case is dissimilar to a car repair job or a construction job.

A car repairman or car repairwoman can perhaps provide one with an estimate regarding monetary cost(s) of parts, labor, hours, and other things. A person who works in construction can perhaps provide one with an estimate regarding monetary cost(s) of parts, labor, hours, and other things. 

In a divorce, the variables and factors include, but are not limited to, how amicable or unamicable the spouses are, do the spouses have a minor child or minor children together, finances, real property, personal property, a debt or debts, amid other things.

Divorce cases are never straight forward. Curve balls are liable to be thrown in a divorce. Divorce cases are never easy. Divorce cases are never simple. It depends.

The need for an attorney

            In a dissolution of marriage case, potential family law divorce clients absolutely do need a licensed California Family Law Attorney to represent him, her, or them. It is a fact that self-represented people not only in these types of cases but in other types of cases severely struggle in general.

            Self-represented people generally do not know the law, they do not know how the law works, they do not know what they are respectively entitled to, amid other things; yet, self-represented people are held to the same standards as licensed California Family Law Attorneys, which is to know the law, know the local court rules, how the law works, make arguments, amid other things. Self-represented people are at a distinct disadvantage because they do not have the trained legal experience that licensed California Family Law Attorneys possess.

            In a dissolution of marriage case, a licensed California Family Law Attorney can inform you of your right(s), what you are entitled to, what you are not entitled to, protect your right(s), and other things.             In a dissolution of marriage case in the State of California, a potential family law divorce client’s absolute best opportunity at success is to hire a licensed California Family Law Attorney.


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